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Kispiox Valley Music Festival delights hundreds in its 27th…

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Sarah Osborne and The Magic Buttons deliver a captivating performance at the River Stage during the Kispiox Valley Music Festival on July 29. (Hunter Wild/Black Press Media)Sarah Osborne and The Magic Buttons deliver a captivating performance at the River Stage during the Kispiox Valley Music Festival on July 29. (Hunter Wild/Black Press Media)
Campsites dot the landscape at the 2023 Kispiox Valley Music Festival, providing festival-goers with a home away from home amidst the musical celebration. (Hunter Wild/Black Press Media)Campsites dot the landscape at the 2023 Kispiox Valley Music Festival, providing festival-goers with a home away from home amidst the musical celebration. (Hunter Wild/Black Press Media)
Dead Sexy brings down the house with a vibrant set at the Side Stage during the Kispiox Valley Music Festival on July 29. (Viktor Elias/Terrace Standard)Dead Sexy brings down the house with a vibrant set at the Side Stage during the Kispiox Valley Music Festival on July 29. (Viktor Elias/Terrace Standard)

The Kispiox Valley Music Festival, a volunteer-run, non-for-profit event that celebrated its 27th anniversary this year, came back to the Kispiox Valley near New Hazelton from July 28 to 30.

With hundreds of people in attendance at the Kispiox Valley Community Grounds, dozens of musicians filled the valley with melodies and rhythms across the three-day event. Performers such as Scott Cook & Pamela Mae, Devil’s Club, MIP, BADMNY, The New Groovement, Gabriel Palatchi Trio, and many others added their unique musical flavours to the festival’s diverse lineup.

Peter Bradshaw, a steel guitar player for The History of Gunpowder and a native of Dawson Creek, spoke highly of the festival and the area. Despite having performed at various festivals over the summer, he found the Kispiox Valley Music Festival to be a new and memorable experience.

“I’m just delighted to see so many beautiful, receptive people and a great audience. And to be treated so well,” Bradshaw said.

“Coming into the city, we saw the beautiful totem poles, which made me feel in awe, and a little bit unaware. I wish I knew more and I would like to spend some more time here.”

The festival drew individuals of all ages, from children to seniors, as attendees enjoyed the riverside event. Among them were Percy Gavronsky and Kathy Gavronsky of Terrace, who praised the festival’s new senior pricing option. Instead of a set fee, seniors were not charged for day passes and were encouraged to donate instead.

“We got our fee waived — not for the camping and all the peripherals — but if we wanted to come in just for the day, it would’ve been nothing,” Peter Gavronsky said. He also reflected on the festival’s broad musical spectrum, saying “there’s something for everybody and there’s every kind of music you can think of.”


Viktor Elias joined the Terrace Standard in April 2023.

Tips or story ideas? (250) 638-7283 ext. 5411 or viktor.elias@terracestandard.com.

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